8/8/11

BATIK WITH FLUID ACRYLICS

Once again I've removed a painting from its frame and changed things.  The three photos here show the original painting at the bottom, the painting as it was when framed in the middle, and the top painting, which is now completed and reframed. 
Notice the changes to the window and the posts beyond the door in the top painting.  The window sill was adjusted to create more interest and variety there.  The stone work was also quieted down by simplifying some areas as well as by bringing back whites to the brick work.  All of this has helped create more movement in the completed painting.  A cool wash on the bricks helped settle down those aggressive warm bricks, allowing more emphasis to be on the man. 
The bottom painting had way too many bricks with no place for your eye to rest.  The foreground was too light, also. 

The Tape Batik process is one that I developed and love to share at my workshops.  I really like the finished painting now and think it was well worth it to adjust it.  Hope you like it, too.

6 comments:

meera said...

Ahh - a master at work --thanks for sharing the wonderful redoing an already great work and push it a notch higher!

Sadami said...

Hi,Sandy,
Wow, the first uploaded work is wonderful. Very interesting process. But in my eyes, all paintings look brilliant!!
Cheers,Sadami

Billie Crain said...

It never ceases to amaze me how a little tweaking here and there can transform a painting. I like them all but my fave is definitely the final.

Christiane Kingsley said...

Sandy, I would never have thought of making any changes to the initial painting since it looks so great. However, with your modifications, it is even more stunning! You are soooo good!

Joan Sandford-Cook said...

All three images are wonderful work, but I can see what you have done to revamp it. I, too, often take old work and give a fresh finish. Still wish I could attend one of your workshops on this technique I admire so much.

Joan Sandford-Cook said...

Thank you for showing us how even a marvelous piece of work can be adjusted and explaining the reason for the changes.